​ ​

Skip To Content

 I forgot my password
BIOL 110 This course studies the human body in health and disease, with an emphasis on the application of biological principles to health education and disease prevention. The subject materials and informational base are selected from the perspective of ethical and practical human concerns. Three hours of lecture per week. This course does not apply toward a major in Biology.
BIOL 111 This course is a two-semester sequence that covers the macroscopic and microscopic structure and function of the organ systems of the human body. Some applications to pathology and health are made but the emphasis is on understanding the “normal” functions of cell types, tissues and organs, and how organ systems are integrated. The first semester coverage includes: cells, tissues, organs, respiratory system, cardiovascular system and blood, central and peripheral nervous systems, immune system, and renal/ urinary system. The second semester coverage includes: skeletal system, muscular system, skin, sense organs, endocrine system, digestive system, reproductive systems, and human genetics. Does not apply to a biology major or minor. Three lectures and one lab session per week.
BIOL 121 Prerequisite: High school or college chemistry strongly recommended. This course is an integrated study of the structures and functions of the human body. It includes chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels of organization. The following systems are covered: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous (including the special senses). Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week
BIOL 122 Prerequisite: BIOL 121 recommended; exceptions only by the consent of the instructor. This course is a continuation of BIOL 121 and includes an integrated study of the structures and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Metabolism, fluid/electrolyte balance, development, and inheritance are also covered. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week
BIOL 125 This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body, geared towards students pursuing careers in allied health. Particular emphasis is placed on the normal structure of the various body systems and some of the conditions that affect them.
BIOL 151 This course provides the fundamental information upon which all advanced studies in biology depend, and is a prerequisite to most other biology courses. Studies include basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, origins, and the classification system. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week
BIOL 161 This course identifies and elaborates basic themes in the study of biology, reviews important chemical concepts including the biochemical and structural basis of cell function with a focus on the relation between structure and function of cells as well as higher order assembly. Considers basic concepts regarding heredity; introduces mechanisms of evolution. Topics include cell structure and function; consideration of macromolecules, including proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; enzyme structure and activity; hormone control; protein synthesis; photosynthesis; energy and metabolism; structure and function of nucleic acids and chromosomes; Mendelian and molecular genetics, including regulation of gene expression; and basic principles of evolution. Four lectures and one laboratory per week.
BIOL 241 Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. This life science course emphasizes relationships and interdependency of all forms of life, and especially the impact human beings have on other organisms and on their environment. This course will contain laboratory/field experiences. Three hours of lecture per week. Credit earned does not apply toward a major in Biology.
BIOL 252 Prerequisite: BIOL 151 This zoology course is a general survey of the animal kingdom and includes a study of the anatomy, physiology, life histories, classification, and ecological importance of animals. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week
BIOL 253 Prerequisite: BIOL 151. This botany course includes a study of plant structures, physiology, reproductive strategies, life histories, and the ecological importance of plants. A general survey of the plant kingdom is also included. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
BIOL 266 Major plant and fungal groups including taxonomy, life cycles, general structure, and representative genera. Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
BIOL 275 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, BIOL 253, or concurrent. This course examines the relationships between organisms and their environment, as well as the interactions between species within various ecosystems. Basic ecological principles including energy flow, nutrient cycling, community structure and organization, succession, population dynamics, competition, predation, adaptation, and the ecological consequences of human activities will be considered. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Laboratories will involve extensive field experience.
BIOL 285 Prerequisite: BIOL 121 or BIOL 151. This course is a study of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminthes and their relationship to health, disease, and other living systems. Topics include structure, taxonomy, physiology, reproduction, genetics, immunology, infectious agents and pathogenesis, method of control, and the role of microorganisms in nature. Laboratory methods include culturing, slide preparation, staining, and aseptic techniques. Three hours of lecture and two one-and-one-half hour laboratories per week are required
BIOL 301 This course will teach the analysis and construction of medical words within the context of scientific concepts. Topics covered include anatomy, blood, cancer, medicine, biotechnology, and pharmacology. Offered: every fall semester
BIOL 311 The purpose of this course is to introduce the basic concepts and principles to students pursuing careers in laboratory sciences. Students will learn how to prepare the chemical solutions that they will use during the course. Lab experiements will be perormed to learn techniques and methods that are used in biology labs throughout the world. Offered: every fall semester
BIOL 322 Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. This course emphasizes the identification, ecology, behavior, and distribution of the more common plants and animals, and an understanding of the communities in which they live. Various habitats will be visited, and students will participate in and learn different collection and preservation techniques. Contributions of art, literature, and photography to the study of natural history will be covered. Three hours of lecture per week. One three-hour laboratory with extensive field trips is optional.
BIOL 333 Prerequisite: CHEM 222. This course studies the chemical properties and biological functions of the atoms, molecules, macromolecules, and macromolecular complexes that constitute living systems. This course deals with fundamental principles, protein structure, enzymes, biological membranes, and energetics. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
BIOL 334 Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM 333. This course deals with the catabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids as well as biosynthetic pathways, the molecular basis of inheritance, and gene expression. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
BIOL 341 Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. This life science course emphasizes relationships and interdependency of all forms of life, and especially the impact human beings have on other organisms and on their environment. This course will contain laboratory/field experiences. Three hours of lecture per week. Credit earned does not apply toward a major in Biology. Offered: every spring semester
BIOL 355 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, BIOL 253. This course is a study of the philosophical and historical foundations of science and biology. Scientific and philosophical issues related to the origin and history of life on earth will be emphasized. Three hours of lecture per week.
BIOL 361 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, BIOL 253, and CHEM 112. This course examines the biology of cell structure and function at the molecular and organellar levels and involves the integration of information from molecular biology, chemistry, cell biology, biochemistry, and structural biology. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week
BIOL 376 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, BIOL 253, and EDUC 375. Objectives, methods, curricula, and materials for teaching biology in the secondary school are studied. Field pre-practicum experience is required. Two hours of lecture per week.
BIOL 380 Prerequisite: BIOL 252. This course surveys the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of vertebrates with emphasis on the human. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
BIOL 381 This course focuses below the fall line of coastal regions of the Chesapeake Bay. It considers the major non-biotic factors of the bay including geology, salinity gradients, tides and circulation, as well as major habitats of the bay, including plant and animal species typical of each habitat. It also considers the economic and political issues that help determine present and future uses of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and its biota. Three lectures per week and seven (8-hour) Sunday laboratory field trips.
BIOL 388 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, BIOL 253, and CHEM 112. This course is a problem based examination of modern molecular genetics and genetic engineering, as well as the foundational principles of classical Mendelian genetics. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics are covered. Three hours of lecture per week.
BIOL 395 Prerequisites: Course specific; Departmental approval. Topic courses in biology may be offered as 1-4-hour courses with or without labs when the department deems necessary to meet students' needs. Courses will have specific titles and descriptions, and will be offered subject to enrollment guidelines. Examples of topic courses include ornithology, parasitology, immunology, developmental biology, etc.
BIOL 402 This course describes the science of biotechnology, takes the student through the history of the industry, and covers the basic science of DNA and its functions, immunology, proteins and their purification, and fundamental techniques used in the research and development of biotechnology products. An overview of the drug approval process by the FDA is also covered.
BIOL 412 This course teaches sterile techniques and the procedures involved in routine maintenance of a tissue culture facility. Emphasis is practical rather than theoretical. Students spend most of the time in the laboratory working with live cells in culture.
BIOL 420 Prerequisite: BIOL 162, BIOL 265, BIOL 266; BIOL 305 and MATH 110 strongly recommended. The study of the relationships of plants and animals, both as individuals and assemblages, to their biological and physical environments. It will consider such topics as: features of the physical environment, biological communities, ecosystems and the flow of energy, life history strategies, population structure and growth, species interactions, biodiversity, biogeography, extinction and conservation, and the role of humans in the ecosphere. Three class lectures per week; one three-hour laboratory or equivalent per week, with weekly trips.
BIOL 425 A comparative study of life origins and speciation from the viewpoint of contemporary creationists and evolutionists, an examination of the geological and biological evidence and consequences of the Noachian flood, and an overview of mechanisms and processes of variation and speciation. Two lecture-discussion periods per week.
BIOL 468 Prerequisites: BIOL 252, CHEM 112. This course is a study of the functional processes used by animals in responding to their external environment and controlling their internal environment. Vertebrate physiology is emphasized. All organ systems are studied. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
BIOL 485 Prerequisite: Departmental approval Independent library or laboratory research is done by the student on a topic selected in consultation with a biology faculty member.
BIOL 491 Prerequisite: BIOL 491 — Senior class standing and a minimum of 26 credits in Biology. A discussion of the philosophy of science, scientific method, exchange and interpretation of data, reference resources, etc., as well as an introduction to the critical evaluation of periodical literature in the biological. One class meeting per week.
BIOL 493 Prerequisite: BIOL 491. This course provides an opportunity to apply methods learned in BIOL 491 Research Methods. Students may choose to develop and complete an independent research project in cooperation with a study supervisor of their choice, or prepare an extensive review paper on a topic in the biological sciences. The final products should be a paper written in a manner suitable for publication in the biological literature and an oral presentation in a Departmental Forums. A lab fee will be charged for this course.
BIOL 494 Prerequisite: Approval of the chair. Designed for a group of students who wish a course not listed in the regular offerings. Examples: biogeography, avian biology, human reproductive physiology. Not more than four hours of credit may be earned in any one term.
BIOL 495 Study on an independent basis in collaboration with the instructor on a topic in Biology at the upper division level.
BIOL 498 Prerequisite: Departmental approval. This seminar style course involves the study and discussion of current research, books, and journal articles in the field of Biology. Students are required to participate and lead out in discussions. Topics are changed every semester. At least one credit hour is required for all Biology majors. This course may be repeated up to three credit hours.
            
Site logo