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ANTH 215 - Cultural Anthropology{expander}

3 hours (3 credits)

Prerequisites: ENGL 101, ENGL 102.

A study of the forces that lead to the growth and development of man's culture in different levels and types of societies, together with its effect on both individual and group personality is explored in this course. Study will include primitive and complex cultures with emphasis on their significance to the mission of the church.

BIOL 113 - Medical Terminology{expander}

2 hours (2 credits)

Understanding medical terminology is fundamental for anyone working in the sciences. It is the language of the technician or researcher involved in biotechnology, biomedical investigations, or health services. This course teaches the analysis, construction, and meaning of medical words within the context of scientific and medical concepts. Topics covered include anatomy, blood, cancer, medicine, biotechnology, and pharmacology.

BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology I{expander}

3 hours + 1 hour lab (4 credits)

Prerequisite: High school or college chemistry strongly recommended.

This course is an integrated study of the structures and functions of the human body. It includes chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels of organization. The following systems are covered: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous (including the special senses). Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

BIOL 122 - Anatomy and Physiology II{expander}

3 hours + 1 hour lab (4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 121 recommended; exceptions only by the consent of the instructor.

This course is a continuation of BIOL 121 and includes an integrated study of the structures and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Metabolism, fluid/electrolyte balance, development, and inheritance are also covered. Three hours of lecture and one three hour laboratory per week.

BIOL 285 - General Microbiology{expander}

3 hours + 1 hour lab (4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 121 or concurrent, or BIOL 151.

This course is a study of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminths and their relationship to health, disease, and other living systems. Topics include structure, taxonomy, physiology, reproduction, genetics, immunology, infectious agents and pathogenesis, method of control, and the role of microorganisms in nature. Laboratory methods include culturing, slide preparation, staining, and aseptic techniques. Three hours of lecture and two one-and-one-half hour laboratories per week are required.

BIOL 491- Research Methods{expander}

1 hour (1 credit)

Prerequisites: BIOL 252 and BIOL 253 or concurrently.

This class teaches the different aspects of carrying out scientific research, including literature searching, experimental design, data collecting, statistical analysis, how to write a research paper for publication, and how to present an oral scientific paper.

CPTR - Computer class{expander}

3 hours (3 credits)

Courses chosen with departmental approval.

ECON 201 or 202- Principles of Microeconomics or Macroeconomics{expander}

ECON 201 Principles of Microeconomics

3 hours (3 credits)

An introduction to the following: demand-supply analysis, the theory of product prices, the theory of factor prices and income distribution, the production of public and semi-public goods through government and the financing of this production through the tax system.

 

ECON 202 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 hours (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the operation of a market economy and to national income accounting. Topics covered are a model of income determination with constant prices, price level behavior and the unemployment inflation dilemma, money supply and interest rates, business cycles, key issues in stabilization policy, long-term economic growth and the theory of international trade.

MATH 181 - Applied Calculus I{expander}

4 hours (4 credits)

Prerequisites : MATH 130 (College Algebra) and MATH 140 (Pre-Calculus Mathematics)

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology{expander}

3 hours (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to the principles of psychology. Included are topics such as perception, learning, motivation, intelligence, and social behavior.

PSYC 120 - Developmental Psychology{expander}

3 hours (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the psychological issues relevant to each stage in the life cycle with emphasis on cognitive, physical, emotional, and social development. The influence of family structures on personality and behavior will be considered. Students will be evaluated on their ability to demonstrate sensitivity to various cultural approaches to growth and development, to think critically, to write clearly, and to show evidence of intercultural knowledge and competence in cross-cultural communications.

SOCI 100 - Introduction to Sociology{expander}

3 hours (3 credits)

A survey course which will stimulate students to consider their employment prospects, family life, or voting behavior as well as considering larger issues such as the war on drugs, the rationing of health care, as well as how society and its patterns of inequality, values, and opportunities affect individual lives. Students will be evaluated on their ability to think critically, to write clearly, and to show evidence of intercultural knowledge and competence in cross-cultural communications. Open to all college students to fulfill social science requirement or as elective credit

SPCH 221 - Interpersonal Communication{expander}

1 hour (1 credit)

Prerequisites: ENGL 101.

This course is a study of the theory and practical application of the communication processes, covering interpersonal communication, self-disclosure, empathetic listening, perception, semantics, and non-verbal communication.

SPCH 223 - Public Address{expander}

1 hour (1 credit)

Prerequisites: ENGL 101, SPCH 221.

Course content includes a study of the art of speech preparation and delivery with emphasis on poise, visual interest, research, persuasion, and audience analysis.

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